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    Venezuela

    Venezuela's Chavez Cheers His 11 Years In Power, Eyes 11 More
    CARACAS (Dow Jones)--Hugo Chavez, celebrating the completion of his eleventh year as Venezuela's president, indicated Tuesday he'd like to be in power for at least eleven more.

    Speaking in front of boisterous supporters on the anniversary of his first inauguration, Feb. 2, 1999, Chavez said that at 55-years old, he could easily endure the rigors of another 11 years in office.

    "I promise to take care of myself a little bit more," he told the crowd, many dressed in red, an important symbol of Chavez' socialist movement. "In 11 years I'll be 66 and that would make 22 (years) as president, and if you want it and God wants it, then it shall be."

    After 2021, Chavez said, "I don't even want to think about it, as 11 more would put me at 77 and would mean 33" years in office.

    "That's too much time. What do you all think?" he asked the crowd, which screamed out "No!"

    Chavez has previously indicated hopes of leading until around 2020 or so, and he won a referendum a year ago that removed term limits, thus making it possible.

    His time in office has been tumultuous, and marked by frequent criticism of the U.S. government.

    In 2002, he barely avoided ceding the presidency during a coup attempt. A nationwide general strike later that year and into 2003 paralyzed the country's all-important oil sector and also almost brought him down. But strikers at the state-oil company--the government's golden goose--were either fired or eventually went back to work, and Chavez seemed to emerge even stronger.

    Yet his popularity, which typically hovers near 50%, has begun to slip over the past 12 months, and some analysts say he now faces his most significant challenge to power since 2002-2003.

    Lower global oil prices have ushered in a grinding recession and, combined with inflation rates at 27% annually, the classic stagflation scenario has emerged.

    At the same time, a lack of investment in the electric sector--which was nationalized in 2007--combined with a drought that's drying up reservoirs at hydroelectric plants, are causing major shortages of water and electricity. The government has had to ration residents' power usage, which has caused havoc in many cities and led to violent street protests.

    Chavez also devalued the bolivar currency last month, and officials acknowledge that's going to undercut Venezuelans' purchasing power.

    Despite all that, the nation's poor remain largely supportive of Chavez, as he uses the country's oil wealth to spend heavily on social projects. The devaluation, in fact, was geared largely at allowing the Chavez government to double their income from oil sales in local currency, thus allowing for more welfare spending.

    Chavez' most important upcoming test could be September congressional elections, where a weakened but still optimistic opposition hopes to grab back a legislative majority away from pro-Chavez lawmakers.

    The next presidential election is set for 2012.

    #2
    AW: Venezuela

    "Plötzlich Chavez" - Hugos neue Dampfradio-Show:

    Venezuela's Chavez Has New Radio Show That Can Air Anytime
    Dow Jones Newswires
    CARACAS -(Dow Jones)- Venezuela President Hugo Chavez, known for making unexpected, important announcements at all times of the day and night, is creating a bit of structure around such proclamations through the creation of a new radio show.

    The show, called "Suddenly Chavez," will be broadcast on Venezuelan National Radio, but has no set airtime or schedule.

    It first aired Monday, and Chavez didn't disappoint listeners who were hoping for news. He declared a 60-day state of emergency, aimed at dealing with power shortages that have gripped the country for months and forced rolling power blackouts and restricted operating hours at shopping malls, factories and government offices.

    The radio show will "serve to define the lines of communication of the Bolivarian Revolution," said a statement from state-run news agency ABN, referring to Chavez's social and political movement, which is named after Simon Bolivar, a South American independence leader from the 19th century.

    In addition to Chavez, government cabinet members and other political players will also make appearances on the show.

    Chavez also has a live, hours-long television show on Sundays called "Hello, President," and he frequently orders radio and television stations to air his speeches. He has taken stations off the air if they don't comply.

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    #3
    AW: Venezuela

    Fitch Affirms Venezuela's IDRs at 'B+'; Outlook Stable

    http://www.finanznachrichten.de/nach...stable-004.htm

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    #4
    AW: Venezuela

    Chevron, Repsol Win Bids to Develop Oil Blocks in Venezuela's Orinoco Belt Chevron Corp. and Repsol YPF SA will lead development of two $15 billion projects to pump and refine Venezuelan crude after winning the country’s first oil auction since President Hugo Chavez took office 11 years ago.

    ONGC Climbs Most in Two Months After Winning Bid for Venezuela Oil Block Oil & Natural Gas Corp., India’s biggest energy explorer, climbed the most in more than two months in Mumbai trading after winning a joint bid to develop a crude oil block in Venezuela’s Orinoco Belt.

    Kommentar


    #5
    AW: Venezuela hat noch sehr viel Öl

    http://womblog.de/2010/02/17/venezue...saudi-arabien/

    Damit sollte Hugo unsere Bonds locker zurückzahlen können...


    ...wenn er das Öl zum fließen bringt.

    Kommentar


    #6
    AW: Venezuela

    Moin,

    hat jemand schon Zinsen für Vene18USD (US922646AT10) bekommen? Bei der Diba ist noch nix angekommen. Aber ich dachte am 15.2 gibt es 'ne halbjährliche Zinszahlung?

    ciao
    Bastian

    Kommentar


    #7
    AW: Venezuela

    Bei Citi/Targo heute früh angekommen!

    Ford 47 steht dagegen noch aus... buh!!!

    Kommentar


    #8
    AW: Venezuela

    Moin,

    jetzt sind sie bei der Diba auch da. Vor 'ner Stunde war noch nix ...

    ciao
    Bastian

    Kommentar


    #9
    AW: Venezuela

    avis Ven18 bereits am freitag 12. erhalten, gebucht am 16. mit korrekter valuta.

    Kommentar


    #10
    AW: Venezuela

    Erneuter Beweis, dass der angebliche "Konflikt" zwischen Venezuela und Kolumbien in der nördlichen Presse gnadenlos aufgebauscht wurde:

    Venezuela is evaluating a formal proposal from Colombia to send electricity amid nationwide rolling blackouts and a severe drought, Foreign Minister Nicolas Maduro said.

    Kommentar


    #11
    AW: Venezuela

    Zitat von bastians Hier:21.02.2010, 12:54 Beitrag anzeigen
    Moin,

    hat jemand schon Zinsen für Vene18USD (US922646AT10) bekommen? Bei der Diba ist noch nix angekommen. Aber ich dachte am 15.2 gibt es 'ne halbjährliche Zinszahlung?

    ciao
    Bastian
    Nicht ungeduldig sein, bei Anleihen die nicht im Clearstream System sind insbesondere bei ausländischen Schuldnern dauert es bis zu 5 Arbeitstagen.
    Noch etwas: Hugo zahlt!!! Bis der letzte Tropfen Öl geflossen ist!!

    Kommentar


    #12
    AW: Venezuela

    Auf Hugo ist jedenfalls mehr Verlass als auf Ford - da sind die Zinsen für die 47er nämlich noch nicht da!

    Kommentar


    #13
    AW: Venezuela

    Hallo

    http://www.welt.de/wirtschaft/articl...nfach-weg.html

    und

    http://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/a...m-starten.html


    CU

    Kommentar


    #14
    AW: Venezuela

    Darauf vertraut der Diktator.
    Der letzte Satz des ersten von dir gelinkten Artikels sagt ja schon alles über selbigen aus...

    Kommentar


    #15
    AW: Venezuela

    Interessanter Artikel in WSJ:

    CARACAS—China has become a much-needed funding source for recession-racked Venezuela, as well as a welcome alternative to the International Monetary Fund, which President Hugo Chávez continues to shun.

    Mr. Chávez, a socialist who for years has been cultivating strong ties with China, said last week that Venezuela has already spent most of the $8 billion Beijing recently loaned it. He said he likes the arrangement so much so that he is asking for more.

    "They [China] have provided $8 billion, and we're talking about them bumping that up to near $20 billion," Mr. Chávez said. "That's our proposal, and it's being discussed now."

    The credit-for-oil arrangement benefits Venezuela, which puts the money in a fund used mostly for job-creating infrastructure projects as its oil-dependent economy reels from the impact of lower crude prices. Gross domestic product shrank 3.3% last year.

    It also benefits China, which has plenty of access to dollars through its massive holdings of U.S. Treasury bonds, but faces increasing oil needs to fuel its robust economic growth.

    After oil prices soared to records in mid-2008, China accelerated the reconfiguration of state-run refineries to handle more of the cheaper, heavy crudes—the kind Venezuela produces.

    Officials at the Export-Import Bank of China and the China Development Bank were unable to provide information regarding the Venezuela fund.

    The two banks have been involved in four credit-for-oil deals that China has signed since the start of last year—with Russia, Brazil, Kazakstan, and Venezuela.

    Mr. Chávez is also using the loan from China to thumb his nose at the IMF and other Washington-based multilateral lenders, which he says have forced "savage neoliberalism" on Latin America and other regions in return for low-interest loans.

    "When Venezuela used to get financing, the IMF would come here and impose conditions and rules, and sometimes it would even dismantle our laws," Mr. Chávez said last week. "But now, with China and Venezuela, we're on equal footing."

    An IMF official in Washington said the institution wouldn't comment on Mr. Chávez's remarks.

    While other Latin American countries have gone to the IMF for loans during the past decade, Mr. Chávez has never in his 11 years in power asked the organization for money, not even when the Venezuelan economy was going through some rough patches.

    IMF country loans often arrive tagged with a requirement that the government undergo macroeconomic reforms such as privatizing unprofitable state concerns, reducing public spending, and meeting strict fiscal targets.

    IMF conditions on loans "go against Chávez's DNA," said Boris Segura, an economist with the Royal Bank of Scotland, who said it is unlikely Mr. Chávez and the IMF would ever agree to a loan deal.

    The deal with China makes sense for Mr. Chávez and China, Mr. Segura said, as it satisfies China's need for more natural resources, and doesn't seem to have any political agenda attached.

    In 2007, Mr. Chávez said Venezuela was quitting the IMF, blaming its policies of tight budget controls and privatizations for the poverty that continues to grip his country and the region.

    Technically, however, Venezuela remains an IMF member as a formal withdrawal would have broken by-laws of the country's sovereign debt and required that it fully pay back bondholders.

    With credit-for-oil deals with China, it seems unlikely Mr. Chávez will be returning Venezuela to the arms of the IMF anytime soon. Two of Mr. Chávez's predecessors—Carlos Andres Perez and Rafael Caldera—swore during their presidential campaigns not to make deals with the IMF, only to agree to them once they were in office and facing economic woes.

    The deal with the Chinese has the added benefit of boosting Venezuela's oil deliveries to China, which could help Mr. Chávez in his efforts to reduce oil sales to the U.S., currently the main buyer of Venezuelan crude.

    Venezuela says it sends about 400,000 barrels of oil a day to China and hopes to lift that to one million barrels a day before long. Chinese data for 2009, however, show imports of Venezuelan crude oil and fuel oil at just under 200,000 barrels a day.

    Venezuela currently produces about 2.3 million barrels of crude oil a day, according to independent estimates.
    —Simon Hall in Beijing and David Winning in Sydney contributed to this article.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...sia_whats_news

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