Ankündigung

Einklappen
Keine Ankündigung bisher.

Venezuela

Einklappen
X
  • Filter
  • Zeit
  • Anzeigen
Alles löschen
neue Beiträge

  • alois
    hat ein Thema erstellt Venezuela.

    Venezuela

    Venezuela's Chavez Cheers His 11 Years In Power, Eyes 11 More
    CARACAS (Dow Jones)--Hugo Chavez, celebrating the completion of his eleventh year as Venezuela's president, indicated Tuesday he'd like to be in power for at least eleven more.

    Speaking in front of boisterous supporters on the anniversary of his first inauguration, Feb. 2, 1999, Chavez said that at 55-years old, he could easily endure the rigors of another 11 years in office.

    "I promise to take care of myself a little bit more," he told the crowd, many dressed in red, an important symbol of Chavez' socialist movement. "In 11 years I'll be 66 and that would make 22 (years) as president, and if you want it and God wants it, then it shall be."

    After 2021, Chavez said, "I don't even want to think about it, as 11 more would put me at 77 and would mean 33" years in office.

    "That's too much time. What do you all think?" he asked the crowd, which screamed out "No!"

    Chavez has previously indicated hopes of leading until around 2020 or so, and he won a referendum a year ago that removed term limits, thus making it possible.

    His time in office has been tumultuous, and marked by frequent criticism of the U.S. government.

    In 2002, he barely avoided ceding the presidency during a coup attempt. A nationwide general strike later that year and into 2003 paralyzed the country's all-important oil sector and also almost brought him down. But strikers at the state-oil company--the government's golden goose--were either fired or eventually went back to work, and Chavez seemed to emerge even stronger.

    Yet his popularity, which typically hovers near 50%, has begun to slip over the past 12 months, and some analysts say he now faces his most significant challenge to power since 2002-2003.

    Lower global oil prices have ushered in a grinding recession and, combined with inflation rates at 27% annually, the classic stagflation scenario has emerged.

    At the same time, a lack of investment in the electric sector--which was nationalized in 2007--combined with a drought that's drying up reservoirs at hydroelectric plants, are causing major shortages of water and electricity. The government has had to ration residents' power usage, which has caused havoc in many cities and led to violent street protests.

    Chavez also devalued the bolivar currency last month, and officials acknowledge that's going to undercut Venezuelans' purchasing power.

    Despite all that, the nation's poor remain largely supportive of Chavez, as he uses the country's oil wealth to spend heavily on social projects. The devaluation, in fact, was geared largely at allowing the Chavez government to double their income from oil sales in local currency, thus allowing for more welfare spending.

    Chavez' most important upcoming test could be September congressional elections, where a weakened but still optimistic opposition hopes to grab back a legislative majority away from pro-Chavez lawmakers.

    The next presidential election is set for 2012.

  • Aldy
    antwortet
    Zitat von Mond Hier:Heute, 15:55 Beitrag anzeigen
    Ebenso wie im Iran oder Kuba ist die Lage in Venezuela schwierig, was wegen jahrelanger Sanktionen (= Wirtschaftsterrorismus) niemand bestreitet. Sie ist aber immer noch besser als in den gescheiterten kapitalistischen Systemen wie beispielsweise Haiti, Honduras oder El Salvador.
    Äpfel mit Birnen vergleichen taugt nix.
    Haiti ist ein bitterarmes Land ohne nennenswerte Rohstoffe und ist nicht selbstständig überlebensfähig, weil sie aus ihrer Armutsfalle nicht herauskommen können.
    Venezuela dagegen ist ein reiches und fruchtbares Land und wird nur dummerweise immer falsch regiert.
    In Venezuela ist die Armut hausgemacht.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • Mond
    antwortet
    Zitat von luke Hier:Heute, 15:40 Beitrag anzeigen
    Informativer Artikel: https://www.spiegel.de/plus/maracaib...0-000165579726

    Ich verstehe wirklich nicht wie man dieses Reginen noch verteidigen kann, geschweige glauben kann, dass da irgendwas aufwärts gehen soll.
    Weil diese Informationen/Berichte falsch bzw. manipuliert sind. Die volkswirtschaftlichen Zahlen entlarven diese Märchen. Glaubst du denn, dass die privaten Medien in USA/EU existieren könnten, wenn sie nicht von den Großkonzernen Geld dafür erhalten würden, dass sie "Nachrichten" in deren Sinne verpacken? Venezuela soll als gescheiterter Staat auch medial abgestempelt werden, damit es nicht zu Ausbreitungstendenzen des Sozialismus kommt.

    Ebenso wie im Iran oder Kuba ist die Lage in Venezuela schwierig, was wegen jahrelanger Sanktionen (= Wirtschaftsterrorismus) niemand bestreitet. Sie ist aber immer noch besser als in den gescheiterten kapitalistischen Systemen wie beispielsweise Haiti, Honduras oder El Salvador. Man könnte aus jedem dieser Länder ebensolche Schauermärchen verfassen, jedoch ist das in der Medienlandschaft tabu, weil diese Staaten die kapitalistischen Eigentumsverhältnisse akzeptieren müssen. Linke Politiker werden dort systematisch ermordet, weswegen es in diesen Ländern keine linken politischen Kräfte gibt.
    Allenfalls Russia Today oder Sputnik berichten bspw. über die katastrophale Lage in Haiti, wo es der Bevölkerung um ein Vielfaches dreckiger geht als in Venezuela
    https://deutsch.rt.com/nordamerika/8...assenproteste/

    Falls du privat einen Journalisten gut kennst, frag ihn doch mal, wie es um die journalistische Unabhängigkeit wirklich steht, oder ob sich ein Medium finden würde, wo man beispielsweise über die Verhältnisse in Krankenhäusern in Honduras frei berichten dürfte?
    Zuletzt geändert von Mond; Heute, 16:05.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • luke
    antwortet
    Informativer Artikel: https://www.spiegel.de/plus/maracaib...0-000165579726

    Ich verstehe wirklich nicht wie man dieses Reginen noch verteidigen kann, geschweige glauben kann, dass da irgendwas aufwärts gehen soll.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • Mond
    antwortet
    Goldförderung ersetzt Absatzrückgang beim Öl. Wie gesagt, die Diversifizierung kommt voran ... und der stark steigende Goldpreis lässt US-Sanktionen wirkungslos verpuffen.
    Nach Angaben des venezolanischen Beratungsunternehmens Ecoanalítica wird Maduro 2019 voraussichtlich einen Goldumsatz zwischen 1,6 und 3 Milliarden US-Dollar erwirtschaften. Die Goldunternehmen substituieren schnell die Ölindustrie ...
    https://dialogo-americas.com/en/articles/gold-maduros-new-oil

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • bischof
    antwortet
    Can’t Even Buy an Egg

    the Commission for Human Rights in Zulia, measured the purchasing power in the state last August 14th and 15th, revealing that a worker’s daily wage (BsF. 1,290.32) is below the average cost of an egg (BsF. 1,440.)
    https://www.caracaschronicles.com/20...en-buy-an-egg/

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • zeroperpetual
    antwortet
    Zitat von Mond Hier:Gestern, 07:47 Beitrag anzeigen

    Die Finanzen sind daher in Ordnung. Die Diversifizierung der Wirtschaft kommt voran, Exporte abseits des Öls gewinnen einen größeren Anteil am Kuchen. Die Versorgung der Bevölkerung funktioniert. ....
    Kann ich überhaupt nicht nachvollziehen, Deine Sichtweise scheint genau das Gegenteil der Realität zu sein.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • bischof
    antwortet
    Half of Venezuela's Oil Rigs May Disappear If U.S. Waivers Lapse

    https://news.yahoo.com/half-venezuel...191909522.html

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • bischof
    antwortet
    US senses breakthrough in Venezuela crisis

    Contact with Maduro’s de facto deputy may unlock solution to political stalemate


    He is variously known as a drug trafficker, a thug, a loyal revolutionary and the power behind the throne in Venezuela. But his friends and enemies agree on one thing: Diosdado Cabello is one of the most important links in the chain holding up President Nicolás Maduro’s government. So when news emerged this week that Mr Cabello had met a US intermediary for secret talks about a possible solution to Venezuela’s long-running political crisis, all sides rushed to put their own spin on the development. Venezuela has slid into one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises, with up to a quarter of its population fleeing abroad as refugees. Years of misrule by the hard-left government have shrunk gross domestic product by more than half and destroyed oil production. Sweeping US sanctions have choked most remaining economic activity


    Propped up by Russia, Cuba and China, Mr Maduro’s government is clinging to power after what was widely seen as a rigged election last year. It has refused opposition demands for fresh elections and an interim government headed by Juan Guaidó, the head of the National Assembly and the man recognised by the US and more than 50 other mainly Western nations as Venezuela’s rightful leader. The stalemate between Mr Maduro and Mr Guaidó has persisted throughout this year, dashing US hopes of an early end to the crisis and forcing Washington to consider other ways of achieving a breakthrough, such as covert talks with the regime. Trump administration officials have talked before about contacts with other high-ranking Maduro government members. But they hailed news of a meeting with Mr Cabello as a breakthrough, saying it signified growing disarray at the heart of the Chavista government. According to Associated Press, which first reported the contact, it took place in Caracas last month, and a second encounter is planned.

    “There have been multiple talks with over half a dozen officials in competing centres of power around Maduro,” said one senior US official. “He should wake up to the fact that these conversations are about a transition to end his power grab.” “The constant themes in all conversations were: how to get out of the crisis, how to find an exit for Maduro, and how to save their own skins and those of their families, not necessarily in that order.” Not surprisingly, Mr Maduro did not see it that way. Speaking during the opening of a bus terminal in the Caribbean port of La Guaira on Tuesday, the Venezuelan leader joked about revealing a secret to his audience before confirming that talks between his government and the Trump administration had taken place during the past few months “under my express and direct authorisation”.

    Looking relaxed and confident, Mr Maduro said that if Mr Trump ever wanted to talk seriously about a plan to solve the Venezuela conflict, he was always open to it. “Whether or not Maduro knows about the conversations, it’s clever of him to indicate that he does,” said one former senior US official with experience in Venezuela. “The whole purpose is to let his supporters know that the Americans have given up on the Venezuelan opposition and are now talking to him.” Vanessa Neumann, Mr Guaidó’s envoy to the UK, said the Venezuelan opposition was pursuing a multipronged strategy to end the crisis, and the latest contacts between Mr Cabello and the US were part of that. “We will do anything it takes. We will go anywhere and talk to anyone,” she said. “The race is on to see who betrays whom. The regime will be broken by a lack of loyalty.”

    Those close to developments in Caracas said Mr Cabello is a particularly important figure not just because he is head of the National Constituent Assembly, a rival parliament set up by Mr Maduro after the opposition won the formal parliament, or because of his media reach via a weekly television programme. His military credentials as a former soldier who fought alongside Hugo Chávez also matter to the powerful armed forces, whose confidence he enjoys.

    Noting that Washington had negotiated successfully with Mr Cabello before, when he agreed in 2015 to hold national assembly elections, which were subsequently won by the opposition, the former senior US official said: “I do think a deal is there to be done. The issue is that Maduro and his government are not going to rely on guarantees made by the US or the [opposition] for their security and wellbeing.” “Both sides are trying to use these revelations against the other,” said Geoff Ramsey, a Venezuela expert at the Washington Office on Latin America. “Only they will know exactly what was discussed but the fact both Maduro and Trump have admitted being in touch is an implicit recognition of the need for some kind of meaningful, bigger negotiations to resolve the crisis.”

    Mr Cabello is believed to want to lead Chavista forces in any future elections, which poses problems for a US administration that has publicly denounced him as a drug trafficker, a money launderer and an embezzler. Instead, Washington is hoping that Mr Maduro’s government will crumble amid internal divisions. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s national security adviser, has compared the key figures in the regime to “scorpions in a bottle, staring each other down, waiting to see who stings first”. But after so many false dawns for opposition hopes in Venezuela, observers are cautious. “It could be hyperactive paralysis,” said Nicholas Watson, who leads Latin America political risk coverage for consultancy firm Teneo. “Lots of parts moving but nothing is actually happening.”

    https://www.ft.com/content/1120377e-...9-296ca66511c9

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • Mond
    antwortet
    Zitat von dmytro Hier:Gestern, 07:12 Beitrag anzeigen
    Nichts persönliches. Nur Geschäft. Guaido hier oder her. Hauptsache der Mad Uro weg, Neuwahlen, der neue Präsi wird von USA anerkannt und die Sanktionen aufgehoben. Wieso nicht?
    An Maduro hängt niemand. Allerdings muss man ihm zugestehen, dass es ihm gelungen ist, das Land in den letzten Monaten zu stabilisieren und den Prozess der wirtschaftlichen Entkoppelung von USA voranzutreiben. Das Land fährt weiter Handelsbilanzüberschüsse ein, die Importe wurden proportional zu den Exporten runtergefahren. Die Finanzen sind daher in Ordnung. Die Diversifizierung der Wirtschaft kommt voran, Exporte abseits des Öls gewinnen einen größeren Anteil am Kuchen. Die Versorgung der Bevölkerung funktioniert. Es ist durchaus eine bemerkenswerte Leistung von Maduro und seinem Team, dass es gelungen ist, unter den widrigen Umständen einen Kollaps des Staates zu vermeiden.
    Ich konnte dies bereits im Januar vorhersagen, da ich aufgrund meiner eigenen beruflichen Erfahrungen wohl ein tieferes Verständnis dafür habe, um die Qualität einer Staatsverwaltung beurteilen zu können. Mich überrascht es daher nicht, dass die PSUV weiterhin regiert. Die Bevölkerung kann dies bei der Parlamentswahl im nächsten Jahr selbst beurteilen. Dass die Rechten keine Lösung sind, dass hat vielen die Entwicklung in Argentinien verdeutlicht.
    Man sollte auch mal hervorherben, dass Venezuela eine sehr gute Bankenregulierung hat, so dass die Banken mit den widrigen Bedingungen umgehen können und trotz allem Gewinne einfahren.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • dmytro
    antwortet
    Zitat von Petra Hier:22.08.2019, 23:33 Beitrag anzeigen
    Eine ganz neue Räuberpistole, die der Spiegel hier präsentiert


    https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausla...a-1283129.html
    Nichts persönliches. Nur Geschäft. Guaido hier oder her. Hauptsache der Mad Uro weg, Neuwahlen, der neue Präsi wird von USA anerkannt und die Sanktionen aufgehoben. Wieso nicht?

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • Petra
    antwortet
    Eine ganz neue Räuberpistole, die der Spiegel hier präsentiert

    USA wollen Venezuelas Führungsduo entzweien

    Wie lässt sich das Regime in Venezuela stürzen? Die USA setzen offenbar darauf, den zweitmächtigsten Mann des Landes gegen Präsident Maduro auszuspielen.
    ...
    Vor wenigen Tagen meldete die Nachrichtenagentur AP, Mitarbeiter der Trump-Regierung in Caracas hätten sich mit Diosdado Cabello getroffen, dem nach Maduro mächtigsten Mann des Regimes. Es sei darüber gesprochen worden, welche Garantien und "Anreize" Washington Cabello und anderen hohen Maduro-Mitarbeitern biete, wenn sie den Autokraten fallen ließen. Den USA gehe es darum, einen "glaubwürdigen" Wahlprozess in Venezuela einzuleiten, der einen friedlichen Machtwechsel ermögliche.
    ...
    Sie desavouieren damit ausgerechnet jenen Mann, in den Washington und die Opposition bislang alle Hoffnung gesetzt hatten: Parlamentspräsident Juan Guaidó. Er hatte sich im Januar unter Berufung auf die Verfassung zum Interimsstaatschef ausgerufen und wurde von über 50 Nationen anerkannt, auch von Deutschland.

    Doch in den jüngsten Äußerungen aus Washington war von Guaidó keine Rede mehr. Bei den Gesprächen mit Regimevertretern in Caracas gehe es nur um eines, twitterte Trump-Berater John Bolton am Mittwoch: "Maduro muss gehen."
    https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausla...a-1283129.html

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • Bahnfahrer
    antwortet
    Meine Veneanleihen im Depot der Deutschen Bank sind im Kurs unverändert: Die 7% und 9,25% stehen bei 15%, die 11,95% bei 28,75%... was immer das auch zu bedeuten hat.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • Mond
    antwortet
    Was soll denn der ständige Unsinn über irgendwelche Präsidentenwahlen zu diskutieren? Merkt ihr nicht, dass dies Zersetzungspropaganda aus USA ist?
    Henri Falcón als Oppositionsführer hatte die Präsidentenwahl verloren, auch bei den Kommunalwahlen im Dezember wollte ihn niemand als Bürgermeister. Im nächsten Jahr sind Parlamentswahlen. Darauf muss sich jetzt der Wahlkampf konzentrieren. Präsidentenwahlen sind dann 2025.
    Durch die Wahlen in Argentinien sind auch die Linkskräfte in Venezuela gestärkt. Man hat erkannt, dass Neoliberalismus = Verarschung des Volkes ist. Die Botschaft hat in Venezuela durchgeschlagen.

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:


  • kodino
    antwortet
    also doch 1.April ?

    Einen Kommentar schreiben:

Lädt...
X